Interview with Author David Fennell (The Sleeper Series and The Art of Death) Interview conducted by Dan Stubbings

DS: Hi David thank you for agreeing to do the interview.

DF: My pleasure Dan. Thanks for having me.

DS: How did you first get into writing?

DF: I first started writing way back in primary school. I grew up in Belfast during the Troubles, which was a tough time. Our teacher encouraged us to write stories to help understand what was going on around us. Something clicked when I started writing, and this became a significant turning point.

DS: How did the idea for The Art of Death come about and can you provide a spoiler free description of what to expect?

DF: The killer in The Art of Death uses social media to catfish and capture his victims. This is a subject I really wanted to explore because it is current. Also, it reveals all of us as potential victims because of the data we show to others. An an added twist, my killer is also an artist and exhibits the corpses of his victims. Nice chap. One to introduce to your mother.

DS: The Art of Death features a strong but troubled female detective. What made you decide to write a female character, and how difficult did you find writing a female character from a male’s perspective?

DF: I write all my characters as honestly as I can regardless of their gender. All the emotions that the protagonist, Grace Archer, goes through are emotions I have experienced. Also, I’ve always loved reading and watching female leads triumph over adversity in environments that men think they control. A female detective was the right fit for this novel, pitting her against a savvy serial murderer. I couldn’t resist it.

DS: The Art of Death is the beginning of a new detective series for yourself what can we expect in the next dose?

DF: I’d love to succeed in making readers as unsettled with the book 2 as they were with book

DS: Who was your favourite character to write in The Art of Death and why?

DF: Definitely Grace Archer. Archer has a troubled past that I really enjoyed writing. You get a taste of it in the first book and more will come in the next.

DS: How much of your own personality did you put into your characters, and did you learn anything new about yourself from writing Art of Death?

DF: As mentioned earlier, some of Archer’s emotions are from my own experience and I hope I have done them justice. My partner thinks I have written myself as Archer’s sidekick, Harry Quinn. He loves to tell people that. Perhaps there is an element of truth in it. I suppose I have a similar sense of humor to Quinn.

DS: What is the best and worst writing advice you have received?

DF: Possibly the best advice is read lots of books of all genres and learn how other authors write character, story, emotion, etc. Worst writing advice is “write everyday”. Can’t agree with that one. Writing is a job that can suck the life from you. There are days when you will need to step away and do other things. Grab them when you can.

DS: Who is your comfort read?

DF: At the moment, George RR Martin, Game of Thrones. I can leave his books for months and come back to where I left off and know exactly where I was in the story. Granted, this may be largely down to the TV adaption. I also really admire his writing style and get all nerdy over it while I’m reading.

DS: Who are your influences when it comes to writing?

I’m not sure I have influences that I am aware off. Like most writers I try and keep as individual a style as I can, but who knows. Authors whose work I love include Stephen King, Thomas Harris, Ian McGuire, John Connolly, to name a few.

DS: Which three books do you think everybody must read in their lifetime and why?

DF: Three books that stand out for me are:

Lord of the Rings, by JRR Tolkien

During my teens I read these books over and over again and always found something new that I had missed. I could not get enough of Middle Earth and its mind boggling range of characters, locations and stories. I will always love these books for what they gave me during those troublesome teenage years.

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte

I think I was in my thirties when I read Wuthering Heights. A late age (I know!) to pick up one of the greatest novels ever. And it really is. I did not know what to expect when I started it and was instantly drawn into the unforgiving world of Heathcliff and those around him. It ignited a lot of emotions: anger, pity, sorrow, disgust, happiness. It has it all. One of my favourite books of all time.

I am Legend, by Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson’s post apocalyptic thriller about the last man on an earth populated with vampires is a classic sci fi novel that spawned four different movie versions and was the inspiration for many zombie films. At its core, it’s the story of Robert Neville dealing with loneliness and fighting for survival against a violent new race of people who will not leave him alone. Some are his neighbours risen from the dead! I found it both terrifying and moving. There is also a terrific twist at the end and great final line. No spoilers. Although I expect everyone has seen one or more of the movies. 

DS: What advice would you give to writers?

DF: See answer 7 😉

This Interview was conducted over email. I can’t thank David enough for taking the time out to answer my questions. I learnt so much from this interview. I hope you did aswell. You can buy The Art of Death today from all good bookstores.

David Fennell - D H H literary agency