Review of Hopeful Monsters by Roger McKnight Written by Dan Stubbings

Why Not Pre-Order Now by Clicking This Link: https://storgy.com/2019/08/02/hopeful-monsters/

Book Synopsis

Hopeful Monsters: Profound Book of Short Stories Explores Humanity Through Lens of Minnesotans. Roger McKnight’s ‘Hopeful Monsters’ is a beautiful collection of short stories, reflecting on Minnesota people, that takes readers on a journey through pain, defeat, triumph and hope. Covering social issues including immigration, race and social injustice – McKnight showcases humanity through the periscope of one of the United States’ most unique groups of people.

Roger McKnight’s debut collection depicts individuals hampered by hardship, self-doubt, and societal indifference, who thanks to circumstance or chance find glimmers of hope in life’s more inauspicious moments. Hopeful Monsters is a fictional reflection on Minnesota’s people that explores the state’s transformation from a homogeneous northern European ethnic enclave to a multi-national American state. Love, loss, and longing cross the globe from Somalia and Sweden to Maine and Minnesota as everyday folk struggle for self-realization. Idyllic lake sides and scorching city streets provide authentic backdrops for a collection that shines a flickering light on vital global social issues. Read and expect howling winds, both literal and figurative, directed your way by a writer of immense talent.

Review

Upon opening Hopeful Monsters Roger’s voice bursts off every page like a lightening bolt begging you to listen. His voice is a road map helping us peel away the hidden meanings behind his words. It felt almost at times as if he was giving me a social commentary on our current climate. Presenting stories that focused attention on several problems throughout the world that effect everyone in one form or another.

One story that struck this point home most was a story called September Mist. A story of two people who love each other deeply but because of race and other circumstances can never truly be together. Roger’s words seem effortless as he conveys the struggle these two face to be accepted within their respected communities before they can even begin to see a future together. A line that stood out for me on this theme was “Yes, some places black folks don’t go very often-not that we can’t-we just don’t” said by Eve. One of the two main voices in the story when encountering glances from a white gentleman in a restaurant. I couldn’t help but draw parallels with the segregation of blacks in the 1950s in the US and wonder whether Roger was trying to get the reader to realise that unfortunately some of these longheld prejudices have never truly left the modern world.

A story which I have read countless times was Rain Shadow. The story centres around a group of homeless people who tackle daily battles with each other as well as their own demons. Roger explores many different problems that impact upon the group from addiction to helping draw one another back from the brink. The reason I keep coming back to it is because of its rawness. Roger presents in sixteen pages, a hollowing account of what it truly means to be homeless when all you have is your own thoughts and a few friends to keep you sane. Nothing feels overexaggerated or put in simply for dramatic affect. The scary thing is he was only scratching the surface.

Addiction is a theme that Roger revisits numerous times using different characters throughout the collection to display his message. Roger paints the corrupt forms that addiction takes in a way that I haven’t encountered previously. He uses addiction as a hook to help show the depths that a person will go to get their fix regardless of the consequences. Whether it is relationship break down, loss of their job, or their kids being taken away. Yet he does it in a way that never comes across as judgemental showing the reader that even the best person can make the wrong decision.

This truth is displayed wonderfully in a story called Iago where our character goes to the pits of society in search of what he thinks is eternal bliss. I felt this was the most powerful story in the whole collection as it demonstrates the dark horror of drugs. Exposing the reader to the wide spreading effects addiction can have on a community in a sensitive and eye-opening verse that forces you to push the boundaries on what you think you know.

What I adored most about Hopeful Monsters was the fact that Roger highlighted the plight of several vulnerable groups within his stories. He wasn’t afraid to discuss sensitive topics such as suicide, homelessness, addiction, and mental health creating an array of intriguing characters and scenarios to give a voice to the forgotten in our society.

Every story seems to be centred around some key universal themes that help to create a narrative that explores the hidden corners of the mind and society. Begging the question how much has really changed? For me Hopeful Monsters is more than a short story collection. It is a memoir of how different life choices can set a person down a path that sometimes they cannot return from. I look forward to reading more of Roger as this collection was a work of art. It receives 5 stars. A must read.

I received an advance copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This doesn’t affect my views.

About the Author

roger

Roger McKnight hails from Little Egypt, a traditional farming and coal-mining
region in downstate Illinois. He studied and taught English in Chicago, Sweden,
and Puerto Rico. Swedes showed Roger the value of human fairness and gender
equity, while Puerto Ricans displayed the dignity of their island culture before the
tragedy of Hurricane Maria and the US government’s shameful post-disaster
neglect of the island’s populace. Roger relocated to Minnesota and taught Swedish and Scandinavian Studies. He now lives in the North Star State.

 

 

 

Extract from The Thought Book 2 By Jay Mullings As part of Blog Tour uploaded By Dan Stubbings

Extract

The Truth About Being A Black British Screenwriter

Getting The Respect You Deserve As A Black British Screenwriter, A Die Hard Mission Impossible… – JM

DID HE JUST SAY THAT?

Yes, I said it! Someone had to! It’s hard being a Black British Screenwriter. In Britain it isn’t Black History Month. Over here, there is still very far to go before you will see the types of stories I grew up starved for. My daily diet is composed of a lot of TV, Film and Books. Don’t think for a single second this is coming from nowhere. I’ve studied my craft and I continuously practice it well. Having travelled far and wide to seek the wisdom of my peers, trusted the opinions of others and even entered festivals in lands I’ve never travelled to!

These are not the ramblings of someone who has given up; rather they are the words of someone who is getting even more fired up! Have you never gotten fired up before delivering your best stuff? – JM

WHERE IS THIS COMING FROM?

What is fuelling this fire? The stupid myth this country is clinging desperately to. Yes, I’m talking about the vaunted gatekeepers. You might like to think of yourselves as upholding standards but you’re really so far beneath it.

Everyone has a reason not to give you a chance as a writer, no one is immune to rejection. This is known to all who have tried to gain representation or pitch an idea etc. Now add being black and male on top. There is a fetish for BAME female writers and it seems the black man is collateral damage. Now am I happy to see BAME people of any kind secure the bag? Of course! Should that diminish the demand for my stories and perspective? No! Balance is the goal after all right?

MOVING GOALPOSTS FOR BLACK BRITISH SCREENWRITERS…

You’ve won awards? That’s nice, but have you won this particular one? Yeah I mean exactly the one that traditionally has never been awarded to your types (unique black) of story.

You know, ones where the black people in them do things over than get whipped for period specific reference, get called uncivilised or savages, sell work out of an estate or hurt people as a hobby.

USEFUL FEEDBACK?

Badly disguised coded language to the highest degree, with people passing on the world’s most patronising advice as if you’re far too stupid to notice. We can’t market your story about black people who came here in the heights of racist Britain via boat and the foundation they set up for future generations. Yes, because all we seem to do here is make

period pieces where black people are treated like fodder until somebody (white) saves them or they die in service.

CONCEPTUAL MISUNDERSTANDING?

Maybe it’s because in this particular story they speak patios amongst themselves in parts. They have only one child, they hustle to survive. The youngster skips school to contribute, working with his hands to come up. He gets married, sends his only child to boarding school, to give him the best possible chance at elevating his lineage to more legitimate endeavours. I could go on but you get the point. 3 generations in one story. Rich world building and character depth.

IF IT WERE…

On the other hand, if this family were to be based in America and let’s say Italian in descent. These same gatekeepers would welcome it with open arms. Rhetoric like, “It’s so authentic, they even speak Italian amongst each other” etc. There is a reason people (not me) have dubbed Tree House the mini/baby (TV) Godfather worldwide. It resonates as a story that needs to be told. Is it an exact replica? No! However, it is a point of reference much like Tolkien was for Martin. Did that make Songs of Ice and Fire any less of a celebrated masterpiece? Open your minds and stop being so rigid. Move past period pieces and romanticising about a lack of social progress.

BRITISH TV/FILM HAS NO MARKET FOR STORIES FROM BLACK BRITISH SCREENWRITERS?

I’m tired of the made up excuses about what can and can’t work, while comparing it to other things from across the Atlantic. British TV is dire because there is no representation. There is no medium between period drama whitewashing and estate life. If there is, it’s an exercise in tokenism and not something with any staying power. It is never used as a launching pad for other unique stories. There is a reason people are seeking these American shows with pluralism. Firstly they are interesting and secondly they at least attempt to address the imbalance.

BLACK BRITISH SCREENWRITERS ARE HERE ON THE BACK OF SKILL/WILL…

Careers have been launched (America), resurrected and there is progression in sight. New voices have been nurtured and they make sure the world knows who they are. Over here? It’s as if you have to wait for someone to die for an opening. Even the people with credits get put on ice and abandoned to melancholy for years. Acting isn’t the only creative endeavour in Film/TV! Stop making it about the success of one person while ignoring so many others of equal or even superior talent. It’s not a turnstile, this one in one out thing has to stop!

LITERARY AGENCIES I AM TALKING TO YOU…

Agencies! Do you even have BAME people reading your submissions? Not that you should be blind to good storytelling in the first place, but why is it you don’t seem to believe unique stories from BAME communities are very ‘now’? Was there a memo stating that being a screenwriter was off limits to black men in particular that I didn’t receive?

BEING A BLACK BRITISH SCREENWRITER BEFORE THE REVOLUTION

I wrote Feminunity 3 years before #METOO and the ‘all black’ solidarity for #TIMESUP. This story has strong female characters (7 lead roles) and covers situations not dissimilar to some of the chilling stories victims have bravely shared. Why shouldn’t this see the light of day? Shouldn’t it be made? Is this not relevant and now? Can’t an R rated film showing something other than slavery/war/Nazi Germany be backed here? Do I have to go to America before England says, “Hey big head?”

FINALLY

I know everybody has heard about the success of The Black Panther movie #WakandaForever. However, there is more to it than just good marketing, casting and the draw of comic books. People are starved for movies which serve up more than the same ole same old. Representation definitely matters! So where is that same energy in the UK? Where are these new Black British voices? I’m just asking for a friend…

 

jm

ABOUT ME

Award winning screenwriter, poet and recently nominated blogger. I believe in Truthful, Fearless, Creativity. Writing is a gift I don’t take for granted! Life is finite, so I’m here now and I’d like to make an impact. As a person I am positive, engaging, laidback, jovial but also capable of intense focus. I’ve known for years what I wanted to do and I’ve set about it with passion and originality. As you can imagine, being artificially held back is not something I could’ve predicted. The frustration I feel is a byproduct.

Extract from The Thought Book 2 by Jay Mullings. Jay is an award-winning screenwriter, and his books The Thought Book & The Thought Book 2 are out now, available from writtenmirror.com. Follow Jay on twitter and Instagram @WrittenMirror.

Thanks to The Book Publicist for inviting me to be part of this tour.

Review of City of Lies (A Poison War Novel) By Sam Hawke Written by Dan Stubbings

Book Synopsis 

I was seven years old the first time my uncle poisoned me… 

Outwardly, Jovan is the lifelong friend of the Chancellor’s charming, irresponsible Heir. Quiet. Forgettable. In secret, he’s a master of poisons and chemicals, trained to protect the Chancellor’s family from treachery. When the Chancellor succumbs to an unknown poison and an army lays siege to the city, Jovan and his sister Kalina must protect the Heir and save their city-state.

But treachery lurks in every corner, and the ancient spirits of the land are rising…and angry.

Review

Sam Hawke has been able to create a fantasy world, and plot that challenges the norms of the fantasy genre, and pushes the boundaries to great affect. As a reader I always look for originality in fantasy, as it can sometimes become bogged down in the same old plot lines, and characters. That are enjoyable however most of the time you can kind of predict their next move. However I couldn’t say this about Sam’s debut novel.

It has a delightful freshness and twists that you cannot predict. That ooze off every page with ease drawing you deeper into the world, city, and characters she has created. Her writing style has a uniqueness that you rarely see within the fantasy genre, and one I enjoyed immensely.

From the way she dip feeds information regarding the vast society within her imaginary world, to how much information she gives us on how its governed, and what poisons are at play. Her voice comes through, adding a insightful prose to the descriptions, and dialogue given to the main elements of characters and the world itself.

I also enjoyed the lack of a magic system within the narration. Due to the fact that at times I feel to much focus is given to how magic is used, and controlled within fantasy. However Sam didn’t need this to make her story fast paced and highly enjoyable.

I loved how every chapter opened up with a description of a new poison its symptoms, what it could do, and how it was administered.

At times I feared this would impact upon the tension within the story, as you believed someone was going to be affected by this new poison. However as I read on the poison fell into the background. As you hitched a ride on the coat tails of Jovan or Kalina the two main character viewpoints within the story.

I especially enjoyed how Sam chose to give us different narrations from what we are used to within fantasy. Enabling us to see the perspectives of the people tasked with protecting the heirs of their society, instead of an assassin who is tasked with killing them.

This bought with it beautifully detailed insights, and helped me warm to, and care about the characters deeper than I have in some recent fantasies I have read. Sam hits all the feels, and takes you on an emotional roller-coaster as you fight to understand what is happening.

The whole story takes places in one city however at no point does the scale of what Sam is trying to achieve feel small. In parts it reminded me of RJ Barker’s Wounded Kingdom Series. As readers are taken on a thrill ride of mystery and intrigue, asking you the constant question of whodunnit.

This is a brilliant genre mashup, and I look forward to seeing where this series goes. Also if the opening line to the book “I was seven years old the first time my uncle poisoned me”. Doesn’t grab your attention. Then quite frankly you need to give your head a shake. This book deserves to be huge. Go out and buy it well done Sam.

Extract from Lifeshocks by Sophie Sabbage Posted By Dan Stubbings

Extract

Just In Case

As the targeted radiation continues to strike my brain, the hours replenish themselves. I am no longer judging this experience one way or the other. It is what it is and I am in it. Letting go. I have entrusted my beautiful brain to a team of strangers who are monitoring it every second to ensure I am still Sophie at the end of the procedure. And as I recognise this reality, gratitude dawns and spreads across my chest. This is what cancer does. It repeatedly brings my need for control to its knees.

All my life I have encountered Something Greater in the ebb more than the flow. From early on, I needed to march into the world not away from it, to find the sacred in the slime and grace in loss and peace on the other side of pain. I have never encountered the divine by going to a church or temple. I find it in those ‘lifeshock’ moments when what is really so confronts what I believe is so – until all the bullshit is shaken loose.

This is what Dr Brown, whom I knew as ‘Brad’, taught me: to look for specifics in a shit-storm; to pick one crest of one wave out of the rolling surf, the one that picks me by catching my attention more than the others; to hone in on a precise moment within the whole cascading experience. Not cancer, but ‘twenty-seven brain tumours’; not the loss of my books but the words, ‘I threw them away’; not date rape, but the bruises on my thighs after a night I couldn’t remember; not Gamma Knife radiotherapy, but the sight of a metal helmet screwed to my head like a vice when I looked in the mirror.

This is a lifeshock: a moment in time when something happens that you didn’t want or expect.

The specificity of these moments is very important. The mind loves to analyse events retrospectively, interpreting what happened by looking back on it and drawing conclusions. This is why some people spend years in counselling, trying to figure out the causes of their pain (which is a great way of not feeling the pain). Analysis does not reliably access the unconscious mind, which mostly stays hidden because that’s where it likes to stay.

When Brad was a practising therapist, he realised that taking people back to a specific lifeshock moment, and asking them to re-experience it, instantly unlocked their emotions and unconscious ‘mindtalk’ (what we tell ourselves about any given thing). It is like opening a file on a hard drive. This is because the thoughts and feelings we had at the time, which went unnoticed, are sealed in the memory of a single instant. You may have observed those occasions when you tell someone a story about something that happened in your life and, as you speak about the particulars, your feelings surface again, sometimes with great force. What I am describing is a way to invite emotions and mindtalk to surface very deliberately so that we see them in the clear light of day. This is a way to access the unconscious at will.

We get dozens of lifeshocks a day, some more significant than others. We allow many to bounce off us, unnoticed. We perceive them through our senses: we hear, see, smell, taste and touch them. They are external to us, appearing as empirical data and colliding with our internal expectations of how things should be. They are out of our control. Through lifeshocks, factual reality knocks on the door of personal reality, inviting us to realign with it, like sailors responding to sudden changes in the

wind direction by adjusting their sails. Discovering how to do so on a daily basis, while awakening and evolving in the process, is one of the primary purposes of this book.

Sometimes lifeshocks need to get very loud before we hear them. Sometimes we need to look death in the eye to realise what we want to make of living. Sometimes we don’t keep our promises until it is nearly too late. We think we have time. We get distracted. We doubt we can live up to our self-imposed standards. Until now, I haven’t known how to write about what Brad taught me and do it justice. He didn’t even do that himself. I’ve tried a few times and came closest in my first book, The Cancer Whisperer. But that didn’t express its true essence, just as it didn’t express the most sacred aspects of my relationship with cancer.

Lying in this machine is a thundering wake-up call to remind me I am ready. I don’t need to write the book he might have written or attempt to emulate him in the process. There is a story to tell that integrates various wisdoms I have collected along the way, including my own. I have found my own voice.

My mind quietens and something stirs in the stillness. I breathe. I listen. I wait.

Extract from Lifeshocks by Sophie Sabbage, published by Hodder, priced £17.99.

Guest Post by Louise Dean Award Winning Author and Creator of Kritikme.com Posted by Daniel Stubbings

Offering advice on how to write and  information on her 90 day course read on:

The Five ‘fs’ that make great novels

As a writer I am known for my frank and darkly comic novels and have been writing for twenty years, but it’s only in the last few months that I’ve undertaken to examine my own process as part of the ‘apprenticeship’ I offer to novelists in my creative writing course at Kritikme.com. I took a close look at the mechanics of storytelling in classic literary novels and discovered that all longer form stories are tragedies and underpinning them are five elements that date back to Aristotle’s own study of the tragedy in his ‘Poetics.’ I have dubbed these the Five F’s.

Don’t get me wrong, I am not advocating to would-be writers the pre-fabrication of plot or rigorous and lengthy plotting. When it comes to ‘plot’ I’d rather you did not. Tools for plotting, spreadsheets and charts become an alternative to writing. You think you’re ‘writing’, but you’re not writing.

‘Now listen carefully; except in emergencies, when you are trying to manufacture a quick trick and make some easy money, you don’t really need a plot….’ Katherine Ann Porter.

The story of a novel is propelled by a major moral crisis. The idea for a great novel can best be phrased in a paradox. Try noting one down one today. It’s easy; the rub between two opposing ideas will give you the spark of a novel. Dying man learns to live. That was mine for my first novel Becoming Strangers which won a couple of prizes The Betty Trask and Le Prince Maurice and found itself on the Dublin International Literary and the Man Booker longlist too. So, put the kettle and grab a pen and write your paradox down on the back of an envelope.

As they won’t be happy until they’ve done one, I ask my Kritikme.com writers to prepare a plot and then I suggest they throw it away.

I don’t think I could bring myself to the white page every day if I knew for sure what would happen next. As I explain to my writers at the very outset, and no doubt they find it either rash or reprehensible – prepare yourself for something like a love affair. As you may know, these are finest when brief and intense. Stephen King recommends a season, or ninety days, as the perfect timing for an affair of the heart, which a novel most certainly is. He’s right. You need to change your ways and hunker down.

The structure of a novel is important, but it’s not as important as creating work that’s driven by the main character’s compulsion to avoid facing what he or she must face to grow and become a hero or heroine. So the structure must be relegated to the creation of material, ruthlessly. That’s the gambit, that’s the game changer.

‘The structure of a piece is often something that happens quite late. Normally you can only decide what to do with what you’ve got when you can see what it is that’s there.’ Hanif Kureishi

It’s the secret to novel success, but it’s terribly hard to stop yourself biting the nails of your writing hand, which is where the routine, rigour and group mentality come into their own. You’re being encouraged held to account and a word count.

Once your material has started to take life, the structure can be applied to it, helping you make sense of what you. It is only at the back end that we draw upon the Kritikme Five F’s tragedy which unfold sequentially in a longer story:

  1. Flaw. The situation which accommodates his or her fatal flaw or moral problem shows signs of no longer being tenable….it is shifting.
  2. False hope. Your hero or heroine’s remedy seems to succeed … but fails terribly causing them serious damage or a reversal of fortune.
  3. Flight. He or she runs from the situation and gets insight into their flaw, recognising their failing.
  4. Fury. In deep, he or she rages against the hell around them.
  5. Facing it. They emerge from the fight with deep acceptance of their mortal condition and reconciliation with their true universal nature, either in life or death.

A novel lives and dies on whether your hero or heroine lives or dies. The Five F’s will see them – and you – through and despatch us at the front door of a home truth; that our welcome on this earth is one which begs each us to be able to take leave with decency.

Anyone who would like to write a book can write a novel, so long as they read books. What’s more you can write a novel and hold down a day job. You should write it in ninety days without fussing over plot, and apply the Five F’s when your material is in your hands. Another old chestnut I’d like to roast is that this is a lonely, solo, undertaking requiring a dusty garret with a sulking cat. On the contrary, it’s good to write alone, but it’s better to write alone in great company and we can thank advances in technology for the virtual companionship afforded by a community like Kritikme for making that possible.

‘My novel took up the sweetest part of my mind and the rarest part of my imagination; it was like being in love and better. All day long when I was busy … I had my unfinished novel personified almost as a secret companion and accomplice following me like a shadow wherever I went, whatever I did.’ Muriel Spark.

Louise Dean is an award-winning author published by Penguin and Simon & Schuster and nominated for The Dublin International Literary Award, The Guardian First Book Prize, and the Man Booker Prize. She is the founder of Kritikme.com, an online creative writing course which teaches people how to write a novel in ninety days. You can get a 10% discount on this course by using the code MYNOVEL10 at the check-out.

Thank you to Book Publicist for getting me involved.km

 

 

In an Ever Changing Digital World How Well Informed Are We? Written by Daniel

In an age of  digital communication. Where everything is yesterday news as soon as it’s printed. With millions of tweets posted every second, YouTube videos uploaded every minute, and websites refreshing quicker than the speed of sound. Is there really a reliable source of information when wanting to make an informed decision.

I think the question we have to ask ourselves is do we really trust what we read in the press? In an era of fake news and death hoaxes, is there really a chance for professional journalism to take place. Where the average reporter must get something out into the world before the next jackal comes along and tears it from their cold dead hands.  Yes that is quite a gruesome picture to paint of the current state of affairs, and I am sure that is not the case in most circles. However I think we must begin to look into what we take for gospel when it comes to information gathering.

I mean I can guarantee you, if I looked onto my Facebook or Twitter feed right now, there would be millions of articles with so called “experts” giving their opinion on topics like the state of the oval office, to something as trivial as to why Jose Mourinho didn’t smile during the EFL Cup presentation. Clouding our judgement, and making us second guess our first impulses which in some cases may be helpful, but what do you have to do to be an expert.

Just take football for example, every so called expert is an ex player, and yes you could argue that they give the best insights, but can they really be unbiased or give us an informed choice if they haven’t been in that situation themselves. I for one know that I scream at the T.V when watching games or Match of the day (MOTD), because commentators and pundits alike, are at times unable to the severe ties of old club alliances, or rivalries when giving an opinion on current club affairs so can we really trust the “experts”.

I guess my argument to this question is, how on earth are we meant to keep on top of the flood of information that is thrown at us every minute of everyday. If even the so called experts cant give us the desired answer.  I mean just take the EU Referendum for example.

We had everything from live T.V debates, Question Time, numerous newspaper articles, and even in some cases all out wars over social media. It caused the whole of Britain to choose a side, and saw more votes cast from the general public than the last two general elections combine. But you ask most people at the time and you would still hear things like I am confused I don’t know what to vote for, and can’t somebody please just give me the facts. So could there be an argument that too much information is instead of giving us a clearer picture, is in actual fact just causing us to feel overwhelmed. I for one at the end of the EU Referendum just wanted the whole thing to disappear. It seemed to dominate every minute of my waking day, everywhere you turned you couldn’t get away. Whether it was someone sticking a leaflet in your hand, or a breaking news feed on my phone by the end I was just fed up.

So your probably wondering what is my point in writing this. Well I personally think yes there is still a place for responsible journalism and creativity. I am not talking about Facebook Live or somebody’s personal YouTube Channel, even tho there are some brilliant ones out there. What I am talking about is real journalism, going out there and talking to the people involved, doing your research, checking every fact, and in some cases following your gut. Not giving up until the story is there within your grasp and every box has been ticked.

Now I am not saying that we shouldn’t enjoy the internet and social media, I mean the average person spends four hours a day cruising through the latest gossip  finding out when their favourite celebrity could be near them next.  There could be an argument there that we all need to get a life. However lets be honest you cant beat the latest angry grandma video, or kitten cuteness to brighten up your day.

But coming back to the title how well informed are we. Well if you believe Mr Trump the press are all liars, and we should follow his lead. But for me we are better informed than ever before. I guess it just our responsible to make sure we gather all the facts from a range of sources so that we can get a range of viewpoints, and move on from there.  In a ever changing digital age what possibility could happen next?

If you like this please leave a comment and please share on any sites you may use so that more people will see it thank you.